Bring on the Plant Pathogens

Many have commented that 2016 feels like a warmer summer so far. They are not speaking in terms of a temporary heat wave, but a sustained long-term temperature increase. Monitoring stations in Florida show these observations are in fact correct. North Florida is about 2-3 degrees above normal for daily average temperature from July 1 to present. In …

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Estimating Corn Yield

Farmers like to walk their corn fields preharvest and gather estimates of potential yields. This information can be used to estimate hauling, storage, forward sales, cash flow, and many other reasons. We know better than to “count our chickens before they hatch,” but we also have to be prepared for harvesting. The University of Illinois pioneered a …

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What is a Citron Melon?

This time of year we often encounter citron melons in our crops and gardens. A citron is sometimes referred to as a stock melon or a preserving melon. The citron melon belongs to the same species as watermelon, but the fruit is inedible in the raw state. It should not be confused with the citron of the …

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The Redbanded Stink Bug

The recent increase in stink bug population is causing concerns for local pea, bean, and soybean producers. Researchers have noticed an increase in secondary insect pests, such as stink bug species, over the last few years as farmers have reduced their use of broad spectrum herbicides. Entomologist throughout the southeast United States believe the Redbanded stink bug could become …

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Asian Soybean Rust: More Widespread In North Florida

Asian soybean rust  (Phakopsora  pachyrizi) was found this week in Madison and Jackson Counties on kudzu and soybean. Soybean rust is more widespread in Florida this year than in previous years despite the recent high temperatures and dry conditions. Typically soybean rust thrives in humid conditions. The first symptoms of soybean rust begin as very small …

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Potassium Deficiency of Soybeans

Due to favorable prices, Columbia County farmers have planted more soybeans than in the past several years. Some of these soybean crops are showing deficiency symptoms indicative of insufficient potassium. Potassium deficiency is easy to identify in soybeans, and soybeans are responsive to supplemental fertilizer applications. Potassium is mobile in plants and will move from …

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The Most Troublesome Weed: Palmer Amaranth

Palmer amaranth is a weed known all too well by farmers in Columbia County. Its fast growth rate and resistance to herbicides is reason for concern among local producers. The weed can become an aggressive competitor against warm season crops, and a serious nuisance at harvest if not managed properly. The Weed Science Society of …

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Benghal Dayflower Requires Timely Management

Peanut farmers often come up a day late and a dollar short when it comes to the control of Tropical spiderwort, or Benghal dayflower (dayflower). I receive calls each year about harvest aid applications after the herbicide program completely failed. Dayflower control from mid to late season herbicide applications have proven to be inconsistent, which …

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Watermelon Growers Scout for Powdery Mildew

North Florida continues to have a large acreage of watermelons and the crop has started under good conditions. Thanks to Gene McAvoy, Regional Vegetable Extension Agent in Hendry County, Florida for the following update of powdery mildew on watermelons in South Florida. Mr. McAvoy  cautioned that dry conditions are ideal for the development of powdery mildew …

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Peanut Cultivar Decisions

As the economics get tighter, farmers are contemplating how far to stray from Georgia 06-G which has been a reliable cultivar for several years. Several farmers have mentioned looking at high oleic peanuts for a small premium, and we often wonder if one of the new cultivars offers higher yield potential or better disease tolerance. The broad recommendation is …

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