Jefferson County Farm Tour Part 1

The Tri-State Row Crop Climate Learning Network was treated to a tour of several farms in the Monticello area, hosted by UF/IFAS Extension Jefferson County. The tour included a visit to the Fulford Family Farm, where Earnest Fulford is effectively integrating bahaigrass and cattle into his cropping system. Earnest had the opportunity to work with a landowner to develop …

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Jefferson County Farm Tour Part 2 (Video)

The Tri-State Row Crop Climate Learning Network was treated to a tour of several farms in the Monticello area, hosted by UF/IFAS Extension Jefferson County. The tour included a visit to the Brock Family Farm, where Kirk Brock utilizes a rotation of corn, peanuts, and soybeans. Kirk described the land he farms not as dryland, but rather “irrigated by God.” If my memory …

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What is a Citron Melon?

This time of year we often encounter citron melons in our crops and gardens. A citron is sometimes referred to as a stock melon or a preserving melon. The citron melon belongs to the same species as watermelon, but the fruit is inedible in the raw state. It should not be confused with the citron of the …

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The Most Troublesome Weed: Palmer Amaranth

Palmer amaranth is a weed known all too well by farmers in Columbia County. Its fast growth rate and resistance to herbicides is reason for concern among local producers. The weed can become an aggressive competitor against warm season crops, and a serious nuisance at harvest if not managed properly. The Weed Science Society of …

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Show Me the Money

Crop farmers across the USA are singing the blues as they wrap up their crop sales and accounting for the season. Locally, it appears there isn’t a crop farmer that I’ve talked to that didn’t have some struggles on one farm or another; either weather, pest, or equipment, that dinged overall yields. When coupled with the …

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Harvest Continues. Where is El Nino?

After a wet September in North Florida, area farmers were treated to a dry October with near perfect harvesting conditions. Many have gone out of their way to remind me I thought we could expect a cooler, wetter fall because of the conditions climatologists have called “Super El Nino.” I’ve heard enough jokes about guys …

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Prospective Plantings – Chew on This

The USDA National Agriculture Statistics Service released their 2015 Planting Intentions Report this week. There is always room for debate about reliability, and this report certainly has the web buzzing. I don’t have much to add beyond what is in print, but wanted to share the highlights as they might relate to our markets. You …

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Row Crop Economic Sustainability Workshop, March 17th

We are looking forward to a great panel of speakers for our Row Crop Economic Sustainability Workshop on March 17th at 4:00 PM. Agricultural Economists from University of Florida and University of Georgia will discuss important topics such as Crop Enterprise Budgets and Grain Marketing. Because we are looking at negative returns in some cases, we will also …

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Farmers Spraying Burndown Herbicides

In this area of North Florida corn planters are usually rolling by the first week of March. I suspect there may be one or two going already. However, February weather has been a bit unnerving for most as they are ready to get the cropping season underway. I was a bit surprised when I looked at …

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Winning the Battle…..But, Losing the War

The first glyphosate tolerant Palmer amaranth (PA) populations were found in Georgia in 2005. This area of North Florida has largely escaped from development of these populations over the past decade. In this area; except for glyphosate resistant corn which is nearly always sprayed with multiple modes of action to control broadleaf weeds, there was little use of …

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