Whitefly Scouting

Whiteflies can cause economic damage to plants in several ways. Heavy infestations of adults and their progeny can cause reduction in vigor and yield of older plants, due to sap removal. When adult and immature whiteflies feed, they also excrete honeydew, a sticky waste that is composed of plant sugars. Sooty mold will grow on honeydew-covered substrates, …

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Whiteflies……What Now?

We knew to be on the lookout for whiteflies in our cotton, soybeans and peanuts based on high populations early in the season. I have had several discussions with Extension Entomologists to learn more about this insect and the implications in our Florida crops. To me, cotton is the simplest; we have scouting thresholds and …

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Precision Agriculture Field Day June 29th

I encourage you to join us at a Precision Agriculture Field Day at 10:30 AM  on June 29th at the Bar D Ranch near Columbia City.  This will be a brief program highlighting many of the technologies used in our local PA project. Technologies displayed include: Veris mapping, grid soil sampling, UAV and satellite imagery, elevation mapping, landscape suitability …

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Entomology Update

There has been a little more talk lately about the insect situation in our crops and Extension specialists have issued a few updates for us to pay attention to. Granulate cutworm. One of my favorites is back again in in the peanut fields. The cutworm are difficult to find as they are nocturnal feeders. Someone …

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Jefferson County Farm Tour Part 1

The Tri-State Row Crop Climate Learning Network was treated to a tour of several farms in the Monticello area, hosted by UF/IFAS Extension Jefferson County. The tour included a visit to the Fulford Family Farm, where Earnest Fulford is effectively integrating bahaigrass and cattle into his cropping system. Earnest had the opportunity to work with a landowner to develop …

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Jefferson County Farm Tour Part 2 (Video)

The Tri-State Row Crop Climate Learning Network was treated to a tour of several farms in the Monticello area, hosted by UF/IFAS Extension Jefferson County. The tour included a visit to the Brock Family Farm, where Kirk Brock utilizes a rotation of corn, peanuts, and soybeans. Kirk described the land he farms not as dryland, but rather “irrigated by God.” If my memory …

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What is a Citron Melon?

This time of year we often encounter citron melons in our crops and gardens. A citron is sometimes referred to as a stock melon or a preserving melon. The citron melon belongs to the same species as watermelon, but the fruit is inedible in the raw state. It should not be confused with the citron of the …

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The Most Troublesome Weed: Palmer Amaranth

Palmer amaranth is a weed known all too well by farmers in Columbia County. Its fast growth rate and resistance to herbicides is reason for concern among local producers. The weed can become an aggressive competitor against warm season crops, and a serious nuisance at harvest if not managed properly. The Weed Science Society of …

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Show Me the Money

Crop farmers across the USA are singing the blues as they wrap up their crop sales and accounting for the season. Locally, it appears there isn’t a crop farmer that I’ve talked to that didn’t have some struggles on one farm or another; either weather, pest, or equipment, that dinged overall yields. When coupled with the …

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Harvest Continues. Where is El Nino?

After a wet September in North Florida, area farmers were treated to a dry October with near perfect harvesting conditions. Many have gone out of their way to remind me I thought we could expect a cooler, wetter fall because of the conditions climatologists have called “Super El Nino.” I’ve heard enough jokes about guys …

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