The Footsteps of the Farmer are the Best Fertilizer

We were fortunate across north Florida to receive crop saving rains at the end of July and through August. There probably couldn’t have been a more perfect timing for pegging and pod fill of peanuts, and setting pods in soybeans. However, we are into our typical problems of August with plant disease and insects. If …

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Jefferson County Farm Tour Part 2 (Video)

The Tri-State Row Crop Climate Learning Network was treated to a tour of several farms in the Monticello area, hosted by UF/IFAS Extension Jefferson County. The tour included a visit to the Brock Family Farm, where Kirk Brock utilizes a rotation of corn, peanuts, and soybeans. Kirk described the land he farms not as dryland, but rather “irrigated by God.” If my memory …

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The Redbanded Stink Bug

The recent increase in stink bug population is causing concerns for local pea, bean, and soybean producers. Researchers have noticed an increase in secondary insect pests, such as stink bug species, over the last few years as farmers have reduced their use of broad spectrum herbicides. Entomologist throughout the southeast United States believe the Redbanded stink bug could become …

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Asian Soybean Rust: More Widespread In North Florida

Asian soybean rust  (Phakopsora  pachyrizi) was found this week in Madison and Jackson Counties on kudzu and soybean. Soybean rust is more widespread in Florida this year than in previous years despite the recent high temperatures and dry conditions. Typically soybean rust thrives in humid conditions. The first symptoms of soybean rust begin as very small …

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Potassium Deficiency of Soybeans

Due to favorable prices, Columbia County farmers have planted more soybeans than in the past several years. Some of these soybean crops are showing deficiency symptoms indicative of insufficient potassium. Potassium deficiency is easy to identify in soybeans, and soybeans are responsive to supplemental fertilizer applications. Potassium is mobile in plants and will move from …

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The Most Troublesome Weed: Palmer Amaranth

Palmer amaranth is a weed known all too well by farmers in Columbia County. Its fast growth rate and resistance to herbicides is reason for concern among local producers. The weed can become an aggressive competitor against warm season crops, and a serious nuisance at harvest if not managed properly. The Weed Science Society of …

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Early Soybean Production System

With reduced seed availability to plant our 2016 soybean crop, farmers will be considering alternative strategies. One of those that might be considered is the Early Soybean Production System. This system is typically a challenge due to conflicting harvest timing with both peanuts and cotton harvest as well as rainfall in the month of September. …

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Where’s the Beans?

Jay Florida Evaluation of Soybean Varieties 2015 Georgia Statewide Variety Testing 2015 There is also an Early Soybean Production System which might be considered.  This is not typically recommended because of harvesting challenges including weather, and conflict with the harvesting season of other crops. However, if a farmer is prepared for timely harvest, it might be …

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Show Me the Money

Crop farmers across the USA are singing the blues as they wrap up their crop sales and accounting for the season. Locally, it appears there isn’t a crop farmer that I’ve talked to that didn’t have some struggles on one farm or another; either weather, pest, or equipment, that dinged overall yields. When coupled with the …

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Harvest Continues. Where is El Nino?

After a wet September in North Florida, area farmers were treated to a dry October with near perfect harvesting conditions. Many have gone out of their way to remind me I thought we could expect a cooler, wetter fall because of the conditions climatologists have called “Super El Nino.” I’ve heard enough jokes about guys …

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